ghostrightsactivist

bogleech:

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Oh yeah, I did forget to say anything about Barlowe’s Inferno setting.

I personally think he does his best work when 1) he’s aiming to disturb and 2) he’s not binding himself to biological feasibility. He’s an expert in the latter, sure, but I think once you understand the rules of real living things it’s just all the more fun to make something impossible and flesh out its inner logic.

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This is my favorite one of his inferno paintings, probably because it has some silliness to it.

steelandcotton
steelandcotton:

A famous set of archer’s rings was auctioned in April 2007 at Sotheby’s Hong Kong. Lot 602, “Extraordinary Group of Seven Jade Imperial Archer’s Rings,” along with its original fitted cinnabar box and cover, former property of the Qianlong emperor (and probably stolen from the Summer Palace), went to an Asian collector for the princely sum of US$6.1 million. Qianlong, perhaps the most well-known emperor, was a major patron of Chinese arts. He also strongly promoted the preservation of traditional Manchu culture and heritage, of which archery and archer’s rings were key elements. It is not surprising that the famous engraving of Qianlong which is the frontispiece to Sir George Staunton’s account of Lord Macartney’s embassy to China shows archer’s rings conspicuously displayed on both of Qianlong’s thumbs. The seven Qianlong rings, identical in size and shape, are of white jade, light and dark green jade, “red skin” green jade, and archaic Han jade. The rings are incised with scenes of mountains, pines, and clouds and the Emperor’s poems in his own calligraphy. One white ring, for example, is carved with the poem “Fishing Alone at Hanjiang River,” a poem Qianlong likely composed specifically for this ring as the figures and calligraphy are in complete harmony. These poems provide revealing insights into the ruler across several decades of his reign.
Source: http://asianart.com/articles/rings/index.html

steelandcotton:

A famous set of archer’s rings was auctioned in April 2007 at Sotheby’s Hong Kong. Lot 602, “Extraordinary Group of Seven Jade Imperial Archer’s Rings,” along with its original fitted cinnabar box and cover, former property of the Qianlong emperor (and probably stolen from the Summer Palace), went to an Asian collector for the princely sum of US$6.1 million. Qianlong, perhaps the most well-known emperor, was a major patron of Chinese arts. He also strongly promoted the preservation of traditional Manchu culture and heritage, of which archery and archer’s rings were key elements. It is not surprising that the famous engraving of Qianlong which is the frontispiece to Sir George Staunton’s account of Lord Macartney’s embassy to China shows archer’s rings conspicuously displayed on both of Qianlong’s thumbs. The seven Qianlong rings, identical in size and shape, are of white jade, light and dark green jade, “red skin” green jade, and archaic Han jade. The rings are incised with scenes of mountains, pines, and clouds and the Emperor’s poems in his own calligraphy. One white ring, for example, is carved with the poem “Fishing Alone at Hanjiang River,” a poem Qianlong likely composed specifically for this ring as the figures and calligraphy are in complete harmony. These poems provide revealing insights into the ruler across several decades of his reign.

Source: http://asianart.com/articles/rings/index.html

baylenlevore
artofthedarkages:

“Reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite”
A repousse plaque from a reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite, a Syriac ascetic. St. Simeon sits atop a column and is tempted by the devil in the form of a snake while Christ descends in a mandorla. A Syriac inscription is faded at the bottom.
Cast out of gold and silver.
Made in the 590s, shortly after St. Simeon’s death, in the Levant portion of the Byzantine Empire. Found at Maarrat al-Nu’man in Syria. Currently held at the Louvre.

St. Simeone the Stylite? Yeah, nice try at slipping under the radar there, THULSA DOOM.

artofthedarkages:

Reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite

A repousse plaque from a reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite, a Syriac ascetic. St. Simeon sits atop a column and is tempted by the devil in the form of a snake while Christ descends in a mandorla. A Syriac inscription is faded at the bottom.

Cast out of gold and silver.

Made in the 590s, shortly after St. Simeon’s death, in the Levant portion of the Byzantine Empire. Found at Maarrat al-Nu’man in Syria. Currently held at the Louvre.

St. Simeone the Stylite? Yeah, nice try at slipping under the radar there, THULSA DOOM.

gutsanduppercuts

gutsanduppercuts:

Martial arts have been around longer than you think. Each of these historical artifacts depict Pankration, a hybrid boxing/wrestling style of combat introduced to the Olympic games in 648 BC.

It was a particularly grim form of fighting as it only had two rules: not spitting and no biting.
That is literally it. Dick grabbing, head butting and everything else was allowed.