baylenlevore
artofthedarkages:

“Reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite”
A repousse plaque from a reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite, a Syriac ascetic. St. Simeon sits atop a column and is tempted by the devil in the form of a snake while Christ descends in a mandorla. A Syriac inscription is faded at the bottom.
Cast out of gold and silver.
Made in the 590s, shortly after St. Simeon’s death, in the Levant portion of the Byzantine Empire. Found at Maarrat al-Nu’man in Syria. Currently held at the Louvre.

St. Simeone the Stylite? Yeah, nice try at slipping under the radar there, THULSA DOOM.

artofthedarkages:

Reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite

A repousse plaque from a reliquary of St. Simeon the Stylite, a Syriac ascetic. St. Simeon sits atop a column and is tempted by the devil in the form of a snake while Christ descends in a mandorla. A Syriac inscription is faded at the bottom.

Cast out of gold and silver.

Made in the 590s, shortly after St. Simeon’s death, in the Levant portion of the Byzantine Empire. Found at Maarrat al-Nu’man in Syria. Currently held at the Louvre.

St. Simeone the Stylite? Yeah, nice try at slipping under the radar there, THULSA DOOM.

gutsanduppercuts

gutsanduppercuts:

Martial arts have been around longer than you think. Each of these historical artifacts depict Pankration, a hybrid boxing/wrestling style of combat introduced to the Olympic games in 648 BC.

It was a particularly grim form of fighting as it only had two rules: not spitting and no biting.
That is literally it. Dick grabbing, head butting and everything else was allowed.

celestialjustdesserts

hideback:

Adolf Hirémy-Hirschl (Hungarian, 1860-1933)

  • Souls on the Banks of the Acheron, 1898
     (details and full painting)

Hermes guides the souls who have just descended to the underworld. He is their last light. The souls desperately reach for him, fearful of the eternal darkness.

The souls of the children are peaceful and unafraid.

Carl Jung considered Hermes the divine messenger, communicating between the light of the everyday world and the darkness of the unconscious: dreams, madness, and death.

"The dissatisfied shades crowd around Hermes as he strides among them and implore him to relax his step, to stay the march of doom. But Hermes walks on regardless, with the calm inexorableness of a god, walks on and past the craving throng." - Helen Zimmern, The Art Journal, 1900

into it