gutsanduppercuts

Anonymous asked:

Are there any Kung fu (or martial arts films in general) with women in the lead role doing their own stunts that you can recommend? Thanks! I love your blog.

gutsanduppercuts answered:

A lot of old school female kung fu stars did most of their action scenes, but I can’t say that they weren’t doubled during some of the more difficult stunt scenes, just like the men were.
Look towards Angela Mao as someone who really shined during her action scenes. I definitely recommend both “Hapkido” and “Broken Oath.” They’re both fantastic. You won’t see any major acrobatic scenes or death defying leaps but if you want to see a woman kick the fuck out of a bunch of blokes then you’re in for a treat.
Michelle Yeoh always chose to do her own stunts. I’m not sure if she did in “Magnificent Warriors” but it’s worth checking out. She did do all her own stunts in “Police Story 3” though…including a motorcycle jump onto a moving train.

Moon Lee and Yukari Oshima…and Kara Hui, actually…are amazing martial arts talents, but many of their big stunts are done by obvious doubles so I can’t really recommend many of theirs. Although, if you just want to see real woman pulling off amazing fight scenes, do seek out their films.

Jeeja Yanin is another one. She did all her own stunts in “Chocolate” and, if you watch the end credits, you’ll see just how badly she fucked herself up.

she-kicks-she-throws

she-kicks-she-throws:

on-your—toes:

Arnis/Kali/Escrima is the national sport of the Philippines. It came from here. Why aren’t we taught this in school?? We should be the best in this. I wanna see it like karate is in Japan. Imagine if Arnis is part of PE. Wow. Look at that pool of talent. Look how the art will evolve. 

Right now, it’s basketball and volleyball. Football is catching up. Why? Advertisers help a lot in creating public excitement in sports. Even if it’s not as advertised, maybe the government could do something about it. Teach it in PE or after class.

just a rant. I also want to learn Arnis. Hay. And gaming martial arts! Saya.

It really would be so cool if more schools had martial arts as a sport like football or cheerleading.  I think that would make it a lot more accessible to a lot of people who can’t afford it or their families can’t get them to evening practices. 

I agree! It’d be awesome for the Phillipines to embrace their national sport via the youth!

one of the main reasons I took up Fencing in high school. That does count as a martial art, does it not? (even though it leans more toward the sport side)

steelandcotton
steelandcotton:

A famous set of archer’s rings was auctioned in April 2007 at Sotheby’s Hong Kong. Lot 602, “Extraordinary Group of Seven Jade Imperial Archer’s Rings,” along with its original fitted cinnabar box and cover, former property of the Qianlong emperor (and probably stolen from the Summer Palace), went to an Asian collector for the princely sum of US$6.1 million. Qianlong, perhaps the most well-known emperor, was a major patron of Chinese arts. He also strongly promoted the preservation of traditional Manchu culture and heritage, of which archery and archer’s rings were key elements. It is not surprising that the famous engraving of Qianlong which is the frontispiece to Sir George Staunton’s account of Lord Macartney’s embassy to China shows archer’s rings conspicuously displayed on both of Qianlong’s thumbs. The seven Qianlong rings, identical in size and shape, are of white jade, light and dark green jade, “red skin” green jade, and archaic Han jade. The rings are incised with scenes of mountains, pines, and clouds and the Emperor’s poems in his own calligraphy. One white ring, for example, is carved with the poem “Fishing Alone at Hanjiang River,” a poem Qianlong likely composed specifically for this ring as the figures and calligraphy are in complete harmony. These poems provide revealing insights into the ruler across several decades of his reign.
Source: http://asianart.com/articles/rings/index.html

steelandcotton:

A famous set of archer’s rings was auctioned in April 2007 at Sotheby’s Hong Kong. Lot 602, “Extraordinary Group of Seven Jade Imperial Archer’s Rings,” along with its original fitted cinnabar box and cover, former property of the Qianlong emperor (and probably stolen from the Summer Palace), went to an Asian collector for the princely sum of US$6.1 million. Qianlong, perhaps the most well-known emperor, was a major patron of Chinese arts. He also strongly promoted the preservation of traditional Manchu culture and heritage, of which archery and archer’s rings were key elements. It is not surprising that the famous engraving of Qianlong which is the frontispiece to Sir George Staunton’s account of Lord Macartney’s embassy to China shows archer’s rings conspicuously displayed on both of Qianlong’s thumbs. The seven Qianlong rings, identical in size and shape, are of white jade, light and dark green jade, “red skin” green jade, and archaic Han jade. The rings are incised with scenes of mountains, pines, and clouds and the Emperor’s poems in his own calligraphy. One white ring, for example, is carved with the poem “Fishing Alone at Hanjiang River,” a poem Qianlong likely composed specifically for this ring as the figures and calligraphy are in complete harmony. These poems provide revealing insights into the ruler across several decades of his reign.

Source: http://asianart.com/articles/rings/index.html

gutsanduppercuts

Anonymous asked:

I trained in Wing-Chun for 8 years (quit when I was 15), I managed to get a Blue sash. The only type of sparring we did was sticky hands, although I don't see how the sensitivity built from that can work in fights these days. Do you think that wing chun needs to be adjusted to fit in with other styles of fighting? (like what Bruce Lee did or MMA fighters do)

gutsanduppercuts answered:

I don’t necessarily think it needs to be adjusted in anyway. It’s a historic style that has stayed roughly the same for a reason. Every part of Wing Chun has some significance for the fighter.
I think too many people blame the art when it all comes down to the fighter. It’s not a style that needs to adapted, rather the martial artists needs to seek another style to fill in the gaps. Bruce Lee just happened to invent his own, taking ideas and concepts from many.

If you don’t feel like Wing Chun has solid throws or locks, look to Hapkido. If you want to learn power and a strong center, turn to Hung Gar.
There’s no such thing as a complete system but there you can get as close to a complete fighter as possible.
And that’s what martial arts is; constant  learning. About ourselves and about techniques. A Wing Chun master isn’t a fighting master, he/she is just a Wing Chun master.
Floyd Mayweather is one of the greatest boxers in the world right now - of all time, in fact - but put him in an MMA ring and what does he need to do? He needs to fill in the gaps. He needs to learn takedowns and ground work and kicking technique. Because he’s a boxer.

Martial arts is like vocabulary. We can always find new and flashier words to make us sound better. Well the words are styles in regards to fighting. Just as a thesaurus gives us options, we need to train our bodies to have options. Do I use Wing Chun close combat here or do I step forward with Nothern Mantis hammer punches? Do I sweep? Front kick? Do I need to eye gouge, strike the throat and then run the fuck away? It’s bodily vocabulary if you will. We can’t just assume one style will make us this unbeatable machine. We have to be flexible, knowledgeable and well versed in an array of techniques, forms and ideas.

Jesus christ but am I tired of these dudes (they’re always dudes) who only ever studied one lineage of Wing Tsun/Chun or whatever martial art (much less only studied it when they were a child), did no research whatsoever, and then speak monolithically for all of Wing Tsun/Chun or etc as if it lacks this, that, or the other thing or is only trained the half-assed way they learned how.

Hey, I’m all for openly talking about particular martial arts and where they can be improved, how tradition can be re-invented, etc, but this stagnant perception by people who claim some sort of knowledge but are actually supremely lazy in it has really got to go.

I agree w/ the language analogy Guts employs here for the most part, but these ossified conceptions of martial arts styles is just so much nonsense.

captainjaymerica

captainjaymerica:

hungryghoast said: ehhh when talking about Chinese martial arts shit is complicated. can’t really say it’s “this” or “that” in just a sentence especially with something so big as “Tai Chi”

All I know about Tai Chi is that it’s Chinese and it helps to fight stress. That is the full extent of my knowledge of it.

what I couldn’t say in limited space: Chinese Martial Arts are generally more misunderstood than other martial arts that you will find (speaking very generally here). For whatever reason(s) (I can think of more than a few) people seem to have a harder time separating fantasy from fact. That goes for both within as well as outside the Chinese Martial Arts community. There are films, there’s propaganda, there are different lineages and expressions within so many different styles. There’s Northern ideas and Southern ideas and a whole mountain of mythology to cut through. Part of why it’s so hard to talk about Chinese Martial Arts is because so much of the tumultuous History of China itself is wrapped up into why certain styles are certain ways. I think those of us training and teaching in the Chinese Martial Arts have a more uphill battle when trying to garner respect, which is pretty ironic on several levels when you think how everyone under the martial arts sun wants to lay some sort of claim to Bruce Lee.