gutsanduppercuts

muslimgamer asked:

Is there history of women who practice martial arts? And I don't mean modern times, I mean way back then. Chinese, Japanese, SE Asia are the ones I'm the most interested to know.

gutsanduppercuts answered:

Yes, absolutely. Granted, some may be harder to find than others but women have, to some extent, practiced martial arts as long as men.
Look at Wing Chun. It’s named after Yim Wing Chun, a woman considered the first true disciple of that style. In fact, Wing Chun is traditionally known as a martial art for women.
If Yim Wing Chun female martial artist worthy of note the Ng Mui must be too, considering she invented Wing Chun.
Lily Lau is a true grandmaster (if you believe grandmasters exist). She’s an 8th generation Eagle Claw master and one hell of a martial artist. She got a lifetime achievement award only last year.
Yang Meijun is considered a grandmaster of Wild Goose Qigong and practiced daily up until her death in 2002…at the age of 106.
I know Qigong is questioned quite severely in many circles but there’s no denying her lineage and dedication to the art.

Then there’s Donnie Yen’s mother, Bow Sim Mark.

The problem with historical female figures in martial arts is that women were basically forbidden to practice martial arts. Therefore, none of their accomplishments were recorded. It’s sad but true.
I believe there’s a noted female Aikido master as well but I don’t know her name off the top of my head.
Wu Rong is a historical figure in Baji Quan too. She infamously imported aspects of other styles into her family’s style and created a more fierce and vicious set of techniques.

So yeah, they’re out there. They’re not always easy to find and, sadly, I think this still influences things today. More women need to know that there were ferocious, powerful lady martial artists scattered throughout history.

angrytaichiguy
steelandcotton:

In ancient China, “a person could strap a sword on his back, and if he knew how to use, it there was no place he couldn’t go.” -Zheng Manqing For those interested in learning the way of the sword, there are seminars  in Netherlands, Estonia, Germany, Canada & across the USA. See: http://www.grtc.org/seminars
Next weekend in Toronto…

chinese sword is one of the things I want to learn most. In particular one day I’d like to practice the Chinese longsword. Surely some school in NY or NJ can host one of thse seminars some time…. ?

steelandcotton:

In ancient China, “a person could strap a sword on his back, and if he knew how to use, it there was no place he couldn’t go.”

-Zheng Manqing

For those interested in learning the way of the sword, there are seminars  in Netherlands, Estonia, Germany, Canada & across the USA. See: http://www.grtc.org/
seminars

Next weekend in Toronto…

chinese sword is one of the things I want to learn most. In particular one day I’d like to practice the Chinese longsword. Surely some school in NY or NJ can host one of thse seminars some time…. ?

giantkillermma

Anonymous asked:

I've seen you distinguish between strength from lifting and strength in martial arts. What is the difference in the two to you?

captainjaymerica answered:

Strength in lifting is directly related to lifting weights, where strength in martial arts is directly related to martial arts capabilities.
A guy who can bench 305 is gym strong. A guy who can lift much larger men is (in my opinion) martial arts strong.
I’ll give examples. I’ve tried to wrestle with people who would pin me and keep me down, people who could throw me and flip me over and turn me into a ragdoll in training that couldn’t lift what I can lift. I’ve lifted with guys who embarrass the hell out of me who couldn’t keep me down when they gave it their all.
One may lead to the other, but there’s nothing to say that a strong man in the gym will automatically be strong in martial arts.

jayvsatlas:

ryusantiago:

Very true. It’s what fighters call “gym muscles”. Just because you have muscles, due to lifting weights, doesn’t mean you can do martial arts without effort.

This is also why you see some martial artists that look weak, perform feats of strength, like breaking stuff, that may look incredible to most people, but may not be able to, say, deadlift 200lb weights.

In the same way, just because you are gym strong, doesn’t mean you’re strong in a fight.

Muscles are trained differently in each subject. This also explains old martial artists that look a little overweight or a little scrawny, yet are ridiculously fast and strong, and regardless of how they look, their bodies are rock hard.

While one can compliment the other, they are most definitely separate.

Well said, Ryu.

training in martial arts can also give you strength (or the ability to express power, more accurately stated) in some goofy (non-optimal) positions. There are some (usually movement science obsessed) people in the traditional strength building community who have been studying and promoting not just movement strength and power but the sort of power building that has longevity rather than creating physical problems later in life. This often means more focus on tendons and joint mobility/strength than is traditionally given by muscle-obsessed-to-a-fault strength lifting. 

gutsanduppercuts

this guy (Very Tri Yulisman) was probably the best surprise of The Raid 2, martial talent-wise. In the first film he plays some random thug, i think one of the ones in the drug manufacture room towards the end of that film. Iko Uwais and Yayan Ruhian have already well proved themselves, Cecep Arif Rahman I checked out online when he was announced as the main assassin and his skill was apparent, but Yulisman I didn’t expect. Of course turns out Very Tri is a Silat expert as well. Definitely would like to see more from him just as much as the others.

gutsanduppercuts

muslimgamer asked:

Do you meditate? Because that's what Asian martial artists seem to do.

gutsanduppercuts answered:

Not regularly, no. I should. I started doing it quite often a while back but, unfortunately, it fell by the wayside and I haven’t taken it back up since.

">that’s what Asian martial artists seem to do."

what……….

This is like borderline submittable to “Yo Is This Racist” ….. But really it’s just a massive widespread cultural misconception over what martial arts is, much less Chinese or Japanese martial arts. I think it’s also a misconception about what mediation is, probably….

steelandcotton
steelandcotton:

A Social and Visual History of the 
Hudiedao (Butterfly Sword) 
in the Southern Chinese Martial Arts.
http://chinesemartialstudies.com/2013/01/28/a-social-and-visual-history-of-the-hudiedao-butterfly-sword-in-the-southern-chinese-martial-arts/

going to have to give this an in depth reading later to see how the history holds up… but cool. (it’s been my understanding, for example, that the Bat/Bart Cham Dao is not the same as a Butterfly Sword, tho maybe this article touches on how they are different but related?)

steelandcotton:

A Social and Visual History of the

Hudiedao (Butterfly Sword)

in the Southern Chinese Martial Arts.

http://chinesemartialstudies.com/2013/01/28/a-social-and-visual-history-of-the-hudiedao-butterfly-sword-in-the-southern-chinese-martial-arts/

going to have to give this an in depth reading later to see how the history holds up… but cool. (it’s been my understanding, for example, that the Bat/Bart Cham Dao is not the same as a Butterfly Sword, tho maybe this article touches on how they are different but related?)

steelandcotton
steelandcotton:

“I don’t oppose playing ball in the least, but I do oppose this feverish consumption of foreigners’ goods. This is exercise, but it is the exercise of the gents and ladies of the leisured classes. If you want to exercise your body, is a blade not enough? Is a sword routine not enough? Are wrestling or boxing not enough? Of China’s eighteen types of martial arts, not one is incapable of drenching our entire bodies in sweat, stimulating all the body’s blood, tendons, and bones.”
- Warlord Feng Yuxiang, 1927 (Andrew D. Morris. Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China. pp. 195-196.)
I am sure I’ve rubbed some the wrong way, when at seminars I said, (teachers in attendance), “You say you are practicing taijiquan, but you are not. You are practicing bits and pieces of the system, not the art.” A big missing piece is the power training. Honestly, how are practitioners to develop internal power without systematic power training? Certainly, pushing on the air while moving thru forms, as important an aspect of training as forms are, does not prove a method for training fajin (releasing power, 發勁). Power training has traditionally been preformed with heavy weapons. I recall a devilishly heavy and flexible hardwood spear at my teacher’s, Wang Yen-nien’s (王延年) school, in Taipei. Not only was it about 4 meters long, the shaft flexed so much with each thrust or coiling movement that it was always a beat behind one’s body action. It fought you every step of the way thru the drills. A few minutes with that beast exhausted the best.
What training with weapons provides is a consistent hard object to release power into. Because the weapon is always the same, unlike pushing a live partner, one can repeat and prefect different types of movements for short energy or long, thrusting or coiling, and so on. Each weapon, the saber (dao, 刀), the sword (jian, 劍), spear (chiang, 槍) and other has its own unique character, each can be used as a tool to develop specific types of jin (勁).
Taijiquan practitioners who desire to go beyond simple exercise and fully realize the art would be wise to follow the entire system Yang Luchan (or other lineage founder) created for us, and not simply practice the parts that are convenient or “easy.”

Holy hell lookit the size of that 關刀

steelandcotton:

“I don’t oppose playing ball in the least, but I do oppose this feverish consumption of foreigners’ goods. This is exercise, but it is the exercise of the gents and ladies of the leisured classes. If you want to exercise your body, is a blade not enough? Is a sword routine not enough? Are wrestling or boxing not enough? Of China’s eighteen types of martial arts, not one is incapable of drenching our entire bodies in sweat, stimulating all the body’s blood, tendons, and bones.”

- Warlord Feng Yuxiang, 1927
(Andrew D. Morris. Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China. pp. 195-196.)

I am sure I’ve rubbed some the wrong way, when at seminars I said, (teachers in attendance), “You say you are practicing taijiquan, but you are not. You are practicing bits and pieces of the system, not the art.” A big missing piece is the power training. Honestly, how are practitioners to develop internal power without systematic power training? Certainly, pushing on the air while moving thru forms, as important an aspect of training as forms are, does not prove a method for training fajin (releasing power, 發勁). Power training has traditionally been preformed with heavy weapons. I recall a devilishly heavy and flexible hardwood spear at my teacher’s, Wang Yen-nien’s (王延年) school, in Taipei. Not only was it about 4 meters long, the shaft flexed so much with each thrust or coiling movement that it was always a beat behind one’s body action. It fought you every step of the way thru the drills. A few minutes with that beast exhausted the best.

What training with weapons provides is a consistent hard object to release power into. Because the weapon is always the same, unlike pushing a live partner, one can repeat and prefect different types of movements for short energy or long, thrusting or coiling, and so on. Each weapon, the saber (dao, 刀), the sword (jian, 劍), spear (chiang, 槍) and other has its own unique character, each can be used as a tool to develop specific types of jin (勁).

Taijiquan practitioners who desire to go beyond simple exercise and fully realize the art would be wise to follow the entire system Yang Luchan (or other lineage founder) created for us, and not simply practice the parts that are convenient or “easy.”

Holy hell lookit the size of that 關刀